Do any of us in Huntingdonshire really appreciate what a wonderful yet fragile green lung is provided for us by the Great River Ouse and its environs?


News 1The members of the newly formed Great Ouse Valley Trust believe we just don't recognise it’s importance or shout about it enough. The Trust intends to champion this very special area to give it a much higher status, so it can be compared with other, better known areas of outstanding natural beauty such as Dedham Vale, The Chilterns and the North Norfolk Coast.

On Saturday, the member of parliament for Huntingdon, Jonathan Djanogly, gave his full support to the aims of the Trust and joined more than 70 people representing local councils, national environmental organisations like the National Trust, the Wildlife Trust and the RSPB along with walking and cycling enthusiasts who crowded into the Queen Elizabeth School in Godmanchester to celebrate the launch of the Trust.

Presentations were made by historian Ken Sneath, archaeologist Kasia Gdaniec, naturalist Pat Doody and landscape painting author, Bridget Flanagan. There were also exhibitions from the Wildlife Trust and the RSPB.

News 2Jonathan Djanogly outlined the Government’s new 25 year plan to protect and enhance the environment and spoke of his love for the River Great Ouse and the environmental projects he has supported since becoming an MP.

Chairman of the Trust, Graham Campbell, said “As more development takes place and new roads are constructed across our landscape we need to look after and cherish this precious landscape. We need to raise its profile in the consciousness of people both locally and nationally. “

“The Great Ouse Valley provides us with a tranquil antidote to the pressure of modern life especially as our area continues to see such massive expansion of roads and housing and the resulting suburbanisation of the countryside. It is constantly under threat”

“We hope the Trust will bring together the local councils, landowners and stakeholder organisations to speak with one voice to protect and enhance this unique environment.”

“We have had great feedback from so many people and we are now analysing all the responses. We hope to start a programme of projects in the conservation and restoration of the landscape as well as looking at ways to encourage walking, cycling and other leisure activities that can serve the whole community.”